Very Soon!

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Ongoing classes beginning  September 8….Tuesday Thursday Friday and Saturday…check link ongoingclasses

Zero Balancing and Movement private sessions are ongoing

Performances as part of the25 Anniversary of Movement Research at Judson Church AND the 25 Anniversary of their Artist in Residence Program September 12 in works by Karen Bernard and myself.      www.movementresearch.org and the http://www.Queensborodancefesival.com, at the Secret Theater in Queens   October 18 and 23,

Workshop and Performance in Santiago, Chile September 28-October 2

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Barbara Mahler on the Intersection of Choreography and Teaching …interview for Dance Enthusiast, by Trina Maninno


Performer, choreographer and educator Barbara Mahler returns to the Performance Mix Festival with her solo IT OcCurS to mE. Mahler has known festival founder Karen Bernard for years, beginning when they shared their work in the same program in the ‘70s. They continued to bump into one another in their Tribeca neighborhood where they both lived and worked at that time.

The two came together again this past May when they revived one of Bernard’s works Vinyl Retro (1999) for a Dance and Process performance at The Kitchen. “It was rare for both of us,” Bernard says. “For me, to be working with someone and for her to be dancing in another person’s work.”

“I was on another planet,” Mahler says with a chuckle. Bernard’s dances are peppered with props and video while Mahler is drawn to work where the body alone is the focal point. Despite their contrasting approach, the two veterans had great fun working together.

Mahler didn’t grow up dancing like her counterpart. Instead, she stumbled upon it while studying at Hunter College. “I walked into the dance club which was on Wednesday afternoons. There was Dorothy [Vislocky] and her infamous drum.”

Barbara Mahler in Bellas Dance. Photo: Rachel Thorne Germond

She soon enrolled as a dance major, taking any classes available. It was at Hunter where she first learned of Susan Klein’s Klein Technique™ through Vislocky — both of whom had a deep impact on Mahler.

After graduation she began studying at the Klein/Barry Studio while working a host of jobs including as a bank teller and house cleaner. “The technique was the only thing that gave me a language that I could understand myself as a mover,” she says.

Today, she continues to teach in the Klein Technique tradition in New York and abroad, describing it as “an original method of developing movement and posture through deep understanding of skeletal and muscular structure of the body and its expressive possibilities.”

The venerable artist has trained hundreds of dancers and non-dancers while continuing to create solos and dances for small groups that are pregnant with nuance and skill.  She spoke with The Dance Enthusiast about how her teaching and choreographic life intersect. Here is an excerpt from the conversation.

Barbara Mahler in We Do Weddings Too. Photo: Julie Lemberger / julielemberger.com.

Trina Mannino for The Dance Enthusiast: What parallels, if any, do you find in your teaching and choreography?

Barbara Mahler:  All of my work and research in the realm of re-educating my own body has laid a foundation for me… My teaching, in turn, inspired my dancing and choreographic life. In the beginning of my dance making, I was choreographing mostly solos. And those dances were usually too hard for me. I was constantly challenging myself to get better.

TDE: Does Klein Technique™ influence your choreographic process?

BM: I’m not sure it informs my process, but the work is in my body which is what I use to create the movement. I work best with people and dancers who have studied with me. There is a particular clarity that I look for, self-understanding and grounded-ness [that comes from studying the technique].

TDE: How has your choreographic work evolved?

BM: It started off being more emotional, simple and sparse. I went through a narrative period. It’s continued to grow technically, but it supports the simplicity and preciseness of my early work. At its best, it develops slowly.

TDE: Over the years, you’ve taught hundreds of dancers and non-dancers. In what ways, has “taking class” changed?

BM: Taking class has gone through many phases; from being a purely physical practice to a conceptual practice. Yoga, Pilates and weight training have had strong influence on dancers. Financial stresses have created more teachers in the dance community for that kind of work, and in turn, have affected the bodies and minds of many — which is neither good nor bad. Survival has become more and more difficult.

The time for the development of work is not as available and so the artistic process has changed for many to accommodate these real life situations. In some ways, I see the mind and intellect has — at the present time — a stronger emphasis than the body or the spirit.

HORSE DANCE COMPANY, Taipe, Tawain

July 10th 2016

The Klein Technique is an ever-evolving technique designed by dancers and for dancers to promote a healthy and efficient ways of moving with and through the major structure of human body. Wu-Kang Chen, the Artistic Director of the Horse Dance Company, invited Barbara Mahler, a MASTER TEACHER, CONTRIBUTOR and internationally known teacher of the technique as well as a professional dancer/ choreographer, to Taiwan for a four-day workshop with a simple and fundamental impulse, to learn. Chen also invited me to translate for the workshop for we share the same interests of wanting to learn more about the technique and hope to share this interest to dancers in Taiwan.

This workshop attracted dancers, actors, dance teachers, athletes, and dance therapists alike to participate and evoked discussions from various point of views. However, Mahler was able to acknowledge all questions and curiosities and guided all back to the basic focus of the technique. As a result, the experience addressed individuality, differences, and simplicities meanwhile sparking greater curiosity about the Technique and its applications.

Speaking from my own experience alone, as a translator learning the Klein Technique for the very first time, I had the opportunity to process the theory and its principles mentally before practice it physically. Mahler knew the complexities and difficulties of my job and deliberately simplified the theory and made her instructions succinct enough for me to follow, and our collaboration allowed participants to also focus and work deeper. As a result, not only COULD I embody the technique BOTH INTELLECTUALLY AND physically as an individual, BUT the workshop as a whole also generated a positive and profound experience as a community. The feeling is that there remains a great space to learn and dance, or live, – an amazing realization.

This workshop, made possible by the generous support from the Asian Cultural Council and the National Cultural and Arts Foundation, is a great introduction of the Technique for the community in Taiwan. We all have anticipated to continue the practice and to invite Mahler to come back for further explorations. We also look forward to sharing the knowledge and experience.

RETURN SCHEDULED  for April 2017FB_IMG_1467727684767

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The upcomings

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Photo: Paula Court

Choreography: Karen Bernard

At the Kitchen’s DAP series MAY 2016

Join us for New Dance Alliance’s 30th Anniversary, where I perform my new solo on June 9 at the Aabroms Center  “ IT OcCurS to mE”
Choreography, performance and costume: Barbara Mahler
 Sound score: Wayne Lopes (1996)

.Profoundly physical exploration of a defining  moment.”
 
 bio:  Barbara Mahler has been an active member of the New York City dance community as a choreographer, performer, body-worker and movement educator for over 30 years. She is a recipient of  BAX 10 award for as a movement educator,a master teacher of Klein Technique. Consistent with her teaching vision, her choreography seeks to explore the endless possibilities that the body can reveal. Her work as a guest artist has taken her around the globe, most recently to Tel Aviv, Vienna, Ireland, Chile and London. She has received support from the Gothenburg Cultural Council, a Sage Cowls Land Grant UWN; Hunter College; Wilson College, PA (March 2015) and for the resetting of “Etched Sketches” on the Company of Adrienne Clancy in Silver Springs MD.   Barbara was also a chosen artist for EMERGE 2014, LIFT OFF (August 2015) and Movement Research artist in Residence for two seasons.
“Mahler, a noted teacher, views dance training as a voyage of self-discovery. Barbara Mahler roots her choreography in distillation, as if she aims to extract the essence of her ideas, making them calmer and purer.”(Village Voice)

“Within a specific structure, all students work at their own pace, and level. Exercises and movements, done repeatedly with increasing intelligence and awareness, or “resonance” facilitate a path of change and openness.

Feedback from a workshop in London– Barbara Mahler’s morning classes and one-day workshop 2015, 2014

I’d like to give some feedback from this week’s professional classes.

Barbara has been amazing. Her knowledge and intelligence is beyond belief. The technique is so fundamental and there is no possibility for the UK to have it in a regular basis. And her pedagogic approach towards teaching… can’t find the right words but it is so incredible but subtle that it is rather invisible. This is incredible because it is there. I felt (having come 4 out of 5 days) that everybody in the class learned something but not in their heads, on their bodies, including myself on this.

I have certainly been challenged and confronted, but in an environment that allowed me to take the time, space, energy to try things out, without needing to learn, or fulfil expectations, or worry about gaining anything, and as a result I feel all these things happened!

I gained a huge amount, a re-connection to my dancing and moving body. A feeling of it’s potential. I go away with a rich resource to practice and practice. I feel better, positive.

The workshop was extremely interesting and physically engaging. The simple movements/patterns with profound and complex feedback. I feel I will be processing over the next few days, weeks…I would like to do more with Barbara.

What are your reasons for taking his workshop?

‘To expand/deepen theoretical comprehension ‘

‘Curiosity for Klein technique’

What do you think you gained from this workshop and did it meet your expectations?

‘New insights into how the body moves’

‘Awareness of Klein Technique’

‘Deepen practice’

‘Freedom of space in my body’

Did this workshop give you access to work that is difficult to find elsewhere?

‘Special teacher – lovely atmosphere in the studio’

‘Klein workshops only happen very occasionally in this country’

A real appreciation of the hip joint and better appreciation of joints in general. Rediscovery of self as embodied and grounded. Pivotal!

UPCOMING  Workshops)  calendar

Minneapolis, MN  May 20-22 details -my second home with almost annual workshops since 1992———Contact kristalangberg@gmail.comwendyruble@gmail.com

Minneapolis has been a consistent venue for workshops, almost annually, beginning with New Dance Lab 1993, and Linda Shapiro, and continuing with the University of Minnesota with a Sage Cowles Land Grant, “Dancing Feet”  Rosy Simas, Zenon, and now with Krista Langberg. Join us!

Taiwan …June 30- July 3  contact horse.info1@gmail.com: http://www.horse.org.tw

MOVEMENT RESEARCH/ http://www.movementresearch.org SUMMER MELT  AUGUST  8-12 2016  10-12  daily! Morning classes

Santiago, Chile Fall 2016 – details to come  September 28-October 4Volante Corpus

My classes in Klein Technique are grounded in the learning process, and the supportive tools for replacing non useful, inefficient and/or unnecessary movement patterns and tensions. How can we learn movement with a  perspective different than copying  an external shape and form? How does movement manifest in our unique bodies , from any style and aesthetic?  How can we create movement that resonates from our spirit?  In class, our  work is done on a body level, interweaving theory and practice. As my teacher, and originator of Zero Balancing, Dr. Fritz Smith says “I wish you could, for a moment, see the world through my eyes”. I am still inspired by my learnings and education with Dr. F. Smith (Zero Balancing), Susan Klein, originator of Klein Technique, and my main movement teacher and mentor;  and Dorothy Vislocky, creator of the Dance Major and it’s curriculum at Hunter College, NY,was my first initiation into thoughts of re-doing, letting go and re-learning /first mentor). A dance kinesiologist, choreographer, artist, dancer.

I bring to my classes and workshops the perspectives I gained through my own movement re-education, and the information I have gathered and researched through my 3o plus years of teaching, dancing, learning and changing. Classes (and workshops) focus on and provide the tools to support movement of all styles of dance and other activities, as well as everyday life. The essential premise is that the postural and movement support of the body is the same in all activities.  The purpose of the “stretch and placement” class is to re-educate one’s body with an interweaving of theory and practice on a physical, intellectual, and organic level.  The result is a clarity and sureness of movement, and a new level of understanding the innate intelligence of the body.

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Click on link for schedule  On-going Classes in NYC

TUESDAY AND THURSDAY: 10-12 at 537 Broadway – Eden’s Expressway. These classes are Sponsored by MOVEMENT RESEARCH . THE MORNING CLASSES ONGOING through AUGUST 18. http://www.movementresearch.org

SATURDAY Morning:  In APRIL we return to the beautiful Brooklyn Studios for DANCE, Clinton Hill. Check the calendar ….1130-1

FRIDAY Morning 10-12 at 100 Grand, the awesome studio of Bill Young.  This is a movement class aimed at the integration of movement/dance with the principles of the stretch and placement classes – efficiency, connection, articulation, grounding, clarity.

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We make conscious our patterns and choices that are often unknown, thereby creating the opportunity to chose. The Body is equally known and unknown

Some recent choreographic projects and workshops:

Brooklyn Studios for Dance

Yasmeen Godder and company/community – Jaffa Isreal September 2015

IDA – London, England October 2015,14

LIFT-OFF Space Residency with New Dance Alliance August 2015

THE PLACE in DC -Master Classes with Barbara Mahler May 2015

Clancy DanceWorks  Silver Springs MD- reworking group dance May 2015

WILSON COLLEGE, Pennsylvania.choreography March 2015

TAKE ROOT -at Green Space, LIC – new dances for 4 women

DEACON School of AUSTRALIA, in NYC JANUARY 2015 winter intensive Klein Technique

SUMMER MELT has been an annual event/workshop 2008-present

ICELAND -2012 sponsored by Dance Atelier, and the National School for Contemporary Dance, the Iceland Academy for the Arts, and classes with the modern dance company, as well as research time for the creation of new solo.

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2011…3 weeks in Chile – Santiago and Valparisso, a government funded residency for teaching and performingintensive workshop, Berlin, September 2012

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nce place. The dancers are experienced in somatic approaches.

MARCH 21-25 Easter-workshop for 5 days 4 hours a day (10 am – 2 30 /1430pm). http://www.tqw.at/en/events/workshop-barbara-mahler-klein-technique%E2%84%A2?date=2016-03-21_10-00

Limerick, Ireland March29-April 1  www.dancelimerick.ie

contact: jenny@dancelimerick.ie     with performance

Minneapolis, MN  May 20-22 details – Contact kristalangberg@gmail.comwendyruble@gmail.com

Minneapolis has been a consistent venue for workshops, almost annually, beginning with New Dance Lab 1993, and Linda Shapiro, and continuing with the University of Minnesota with a Sage Cowles Land Grant, “Dancing Feet”  Rosy Simas, Zenon, and now with Krista Langberg. Join us!

Taiwan …June 30- July 3  contact horse.info1@gmail.com: http://www.horse.org.tw

MOVEMENT RESEARCH/ http://www.movementresearch.org SUMMER MELT  AUGUST  8-12 2016  10-12  daily! Morning classes

Santiago, Chile Fall 2016 – details to come

My classes in Klein Technique are grounded in the learning process, and the supportive tools for replacing non useful, inefficient and/or unnecessary movement patterns and tensions. How can we learn movement with a  perspective different than copying  an external shape and form? How does movement manifest in our unique bodies , from any style and aesthetic?  How can we create movement that resonates from our spirit?  In class, our  work is done on a body level, interweaving theory and practice. As my teacher, and originator of Zero Balancing, Dr. Fritz Smith says “I wish you could, for a moment, see the world through my eyes”. I am still inspired by my learnings and education with Dr. F. Smith (Zero Balancing), Susan Klein, originator of Klein Technique, and my main movement teacher and mentor;  and Dorothy Vislocky, creator of the Dance Major and it’s curriculum at Hunter College, NY,was my first initiation into thoughts of re-doing, letting go and re-learning /first mentor). A dance kinesiologist, choreographer, artist, dancer.

I bring to my classes and workshops the perspectives I gained through my own movement re-education, and the information I have gathered and researched through my 3o plus years of teaching, dancing, learning and changing. Classes (and workshops) focus on and provide the tools to support movement of all styles of dance and other activities, as well as everyday life. The essential premise is that the postural and movement support of the body is the same in all activities.  The purpose of the “stretch and placement” class is to re-educate one’s body with an interweaving of theory and practice on a physical, intellectual, and organic level.  The result is a clarity and sureness of movement, and a new level of understanding the innate intelligence of the body.

julie_lemberger-2462

Click on link for schedule  On-going Classes in NYC

TUESDAY AND THURSDAY: 10-12 at 537 Broadway – Eden’s Expressway. These classes are Sponsored by MOVEMENT RESEARCH . THE MORNING CLASSES ONGOING through AUGUST 18. http://www.movementresearch.org

SATURDAY Morning:  In APRIL we return to the beautiful Brooklyn Studios for DANCE, Clinton Hill. Check the calendar above.

FRIDAY Morning 10-12 at 100 Grand, the awesome studio of Bill Young.  This is a movement class aimed at the integration of movement/dance with the principles of the stretch and placement classes – efficiency, connection, articulation, grounding, clarity.

julie_lemberger-2523

Daily classes are a cohesive integration of body and mind, based on the principles of change, possibilities and a better functioning body. The technique is firmly grounded in the principles that what helps us move and function at our optimum efficiency are simple ideas, exercises and practice, the demands being the same in dance as everyday life. It’s principles go beyond aesthetic viewpoints, being a system, a technique that provides strong grounding underpinnings for all types of movement. The work done in class is to re-educate the body with an interweaving of theory and practice on a physical level, at the level of the bone and the deep internal musculature and supportive connections that move, and ground us – between the pelvis, the legs and the earth and back up to the skull. The result – a clarity and sureness of movement efficiency, fluidity, and a new level of understanding the innate intelligence of one’s body. With these teachings we come closer to realizing who we are as movers – as individuals; unique in our creativity, our movement, our being.We don’t “exercise” yet we become stronger, more articulate; the body more facile and resilient. We learn to use the floor, and work without a specific aesthetic construct, leaving us open to all styles.

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Time Marches …..

20141005_083408In the late 1970’s ” release” classes began popping up south of Houston Street  to just below Chambers Street in small and not so small live/work loft spaces. There are sooo few, if any, left in Manhattan.  110 Chambers Street was were Ellen Webb began her classes of lying on the floor and letting go.  Very few other such alternatives were available to besides more strict and form oriented dance techniques. New Ideas had begun permeating  through the dance scene of NYC in the mid 70’s, with Bonnie Cohen, Susan Klein, Colette Barry, Gail Stern, Jenny Kapular (BMC). Irene Feigenheimer (spelling please!!) had a studio on Laight Street, where small classes happened because folks were afraid of coming to Tribeca then!  It was here I first met Art Bridgeman.  I did classes with Jeannette Stoner as well at her Leonard Street loft, the work of Lulu Sweigard, I believe,  and Open Movement was happening first at 99 Prince Street and then PS 122.  Of course there was contact improvisation happening, growing, developing.  I was not, at that time, aware of the Judson Movement. The Susan Klein School of Dance opened in 1979, downtown on Beach Street.

The floor barre work  of Zena Rommett’s was an alternative at that time.  Ellen Webb”s live work space, over a bar,  became completely commercial, and so was passed on to Betsy Hulton, with a handshake from both Ellen and the bar owner (also a renter in the building). It was a space with no classes but became a place where dances and art and performance were being created – an affordable rehearsal space with easy access. Betsy moved to Italy, and Rachel Thorne Germond and I took over the lease, also with a handshake from the bar owner, and we continued to provide affordable space to work  because it was possible.  We continued working, making, dancing. Rachel Thorne Germond moved away for her MFA and the lease was then mine, (late 90’s?) also with a handshake with the bar owner, and the dancing creating performance work and Zero Balancing work continued. I also thought of it as a glorious oasis where time could stop, and things would happen. Art was made, dancing happened. We had no classes as there were many other places to participate in that activity. In 1999 or so, the bar owner passed away and the lease was then in the hands of the building owner. No more handshakes, and of course a doubling of rent. Still, manageable. From here I saw the Towers hit, felt the plane practically touch the roof of my building. I saw the flames and sounds, the screams; felt the buildings shake and tremble. In 2002, the space was no longer available – no  handshakes, no lease.    When I left I took with me the 100 year old Seth Thomas plug in clock, which had ticked away for many, going, going, going and incrementally time continued, much as the creative process goes – sometimes just going on its own. Upon my return from London, United Kingdom, in 2012, my first time there since  2000, the clock, (unpugged because I was away), began,  to move slower. For three days, the 114 year old or so clock went along, dying  just about at the beginning of the New Year. Fraught with metaphor this is  (delve in, day dream, open up your mind.)  I  have stories and stories, superstitions and experiences, with clocks, time, watches and other similiar objects.  In this situation I was simply reminded, one again, that everything changes, time marches on, creativity is a part of one’s (my life), every one and everything changes. Things and people die and others, born
Happy New Year and may it be filled with love, compassion, creativity,forgiveness and community.

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Barbara Mahler

Barbara Mahler

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with Jamie Chandler and Jamie Graham..2012

with Jamie Chandler and Jamie Graham..2012

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Thoughts on Klein Technique tm Stretch and Placement

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Teaching, Studying, Being, Learning – Finding center.

Excerpts – “When she Stumbles” – Judson Church as part of Movement Research Presenting Series w Jamie Graham, Alissa Horowitz, Barbara Mahler

I teach almost daily, for more years than I would like to say, !  I move daily. I explore. I still come home to the work I have been studying and practicing since 1977, continually deepening my experience to better communicate to my students, and my dancers as well as to keep myself connected to all that matters.

Special acknowledgements to Dorothy Vislocky for being the force that brought me onto this crazy path called “dance/bodies/moving/seeing.”

My homes are  Klein Technique, first certified teacher, contributor, student since 1977,  and Zero Balancing, certified as faculty and practitioner since 1986.- Profound and deep thanks to Dr. Fritz Smith and Susan T Klein.

I am honored to be a recipient of a BAX 10 Award for Arts Education this year, 2013.

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BERLIN- ah!

September once again brings me  me back to in Berlin with a large and wonderfully diverse group of movers and shakers!    It will be a fourth time with Felix Rukert and Schwelle 7, and my sixth time teaching in Berlin.

 My students teach me .

We work alone, in pairs. We are still, we move. We use imagery, anatomy, and draw on time and process.

I was surrounded by familiar faces, and new faces.  The path to learning new ways to move and  new ways to work to increase technical range and facility,  prolong the length of one’s dancing/moving career by lessening pain, and increasing self knowledge as well as joy in the process is my aim.Come join us in Berlin, or elsewhere in Europe, Canada or the US.

AHH!

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Iceland!-September 2012

An amazingly beautiful country,- Iceland.

I  found myself there in September teaching at the Arts Academy to a new generation of dancers and choreographers.  I also had the pleasure of working with the modern dance company, and the organization “Danse Atelier”.  My experiences were, as always, deep and joyful, difficult and fun,- all workshops have their own flavor as the group determines so much the direction. The information;words, repeated many times in these past over 20 years, maintain a richness and resilience.  The work I do/teach always teaches me as well as teaches my students. Many hours a day to a vibrant an rich community, and hours of work time in the studio brought about a new and still in progress solo. Green Space in LIC, NY gave it its first showing on September 16. Its growth will continue. I am now in Berlin, teaching another wonderful group, and want to take the time to thank my teachers = Fritz Smith and Susan Klein.

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from SOLO w Nany Allison, choreography Barbara Mahler

from SOLO w Nany Allison, choreography Barbara Mahler

Nancy Allison

 

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To continue with Daisy Levy’s interview with Barbara………

B:  But, um, I came to Hunter College because they had a particular program for teaching in the inner city, in the inner city schools, ‘cause I grew up in the housing projects [poor audio quality] interested in teaching, in helping – and they had a program called the TTT, and I applied, and Hunter was one of the top, uh, Hunter and Brooklyn College were the top [pauses, hand gestures] colleges in the City University so I got into the program that I was interested in, and so I started teaching in the elementary schools. That’s how they do it. So instead of waiting … ’til you’re [break in audio] and then you go into the school and go [makes a face, rolls eyes, sticks out tongue] that’s not for me – straight away into these inner city school – in these uh, the worst schools in the city and  [laughs rolls eyes] THIS IS NOT BEING USED AS VIDEO TAPE [shakes head and still laughing]

Really interesting, and it was challenging. But also, at the same time, they had, maybe there were 20 dance majors – this was in the mid 70s http://bad so I was talking some improvisation classes – they were with some clubs and they had a dance major that was developed by Professor Vislocky.

D: Can you spell that for me, please?

B: V-I-S-L-O-C-K-Y – and she’s um, a pioneer in dance anatomy. I don’t know if you know her

D: I know of the name, yes.

B: Yeah – she danced in the Nikolai company for a few years and then she developed this program and also had ways of, or interesting ways of teaching anatomy to dancers in an experiential manner. And, uh I started with improvisation and composition so I could understand. Really I couldn’t do anything, but I was just in LOVE with all kinds of movement and explorations of creativity, and performance

quote/unquote it had to be in the form or anything like that. In ballet I was just a mess I was just here [lifts shoulders up closer to neck and ears, stiffens arms, holds head rigid]. I was like that for years –

D: So, um, you said you didn’t have a dancer’s body. What does that mean?

B: Oh, uh, very hyper-extended low back, uh, they tell me, [my ribcage] proceeded me into the room at least ten minutes ahead of me. Probably a little exaggeration. SO, nothing could really let go. I was stuck like this [arms out to side at 45 degrees, ribcage lifted, lower back extended] and we know that our bodies and our emotions aren’t different. So there were many many years of digging around that I had to [bad audio] for my body to change. It’s pretty normal now.

D: Yes. Yes. So would you say …if that’s NOT a dancer’s body? What IS a dancer’s body?

B: Well, now, and the way I trained, I think it depends on what somebody wants to do, the effort they  put into moving and the way they want to move. And, I think change is possible. Um, you know I just remember the frustration of being in classes, and never getting an audition, and never getting anything, and being told how resistant I was, and it just sucked. You know I had no idea what I was doing wrong, um, that I was completely cut off from my physical self, and yet, dancing was the only thing that made me like myself – it was a paradox, and so I continued to try to move and just you know stayed with more creative types of performance.

D: So, describe what some of that more creative types of performance- is that improvisational … ?

B: Yeah -( I steered away from technical uh classes until I got to be in my late 30s). I found this, what seemed to be, crazy studio on the Upper West Side – the Susan Klein and Colette Barry School of Dance and they did, what seemed then, weird stretch and placement classes, and talked very differently about the body and technique anybody else did at the time.

D: And when was that?

B: Um, I found the studio, I wandered in – that’s on my website there – I wandered in one summer, when I was, maybe in 76? And I took class there everyday, three times a day,

D: Three times a DAY?

B: I took stretch classes three times a day. [Smiling. Nodding.]

D: ok. Wow.

B: I didn’t feel anything changing. So that just tells you kind of where I am. But I was changing. So I know that by the time I got back to school, I had changed. Things were changing. But as soon as I went back to what I normally would do, and the atmosphere was different, I just found myself going back into my really rigid ways of thinking – it had more to do with thinking – and my perceptions of myself slipped back – whatever they were, they were pretty unconscious, um, I just knew I was never gonna be good enough. I mean I think that essentially, that was like the bottom line – I was never good enough.

D: So …

B: But I still, I could dance. I was not a good mover. I  had potential. But you know how can you be resistant, when you don’t – when you’re not in touch with yourself –

D: So, this may be is a tangent, but do you –  when people were saying to you, you’re very resistant to change – do you think they were talking about your body as resistant to change, or your, like your self, or your – what is your – do you know what I mean? Was it that you were so strong willed?

B:  I’m strong willed. I grew up in the housing projects. We were very poor. Um, I had a lot of will and, um, you know it was a big thing to get out of the projects, and to even get into, to go to college, and go through the honors programs, in high school. That took a lot. So I guess I needed the will but the will at the same time, was in my way. – it’s hard to say. It’s hard for me to say.

D: Yes. I understand.

B:  I think for a lot of dancers now, technique is really very harsh. It’s kind of gone back. You know how things go in these waves of high technical facility,  and that it shortens a dancer’s life, their dancing life and they get vey single focused on doing this one thing, so they can achieve this particular aesthetic, so I’m not sure if that’s different from the way I was thinking, though I wouldn’t say it had to do with my drive for technique. But that kind of one tunnel vision to focus on what you want to do just keeps you driving in that … and the only thing that makes you change is an injury or some major incident in your life.

D: Yes. So, can I go back to – would you say that this moment when you found Susan Klein and … who was she?

B: Colette Barry

D: Colette Barry – was that sort of a transformative moment for you?

B: Well, not right away. But, it was. It was something in the fact that I wasn’t corrected. I wasn’t corrected. Which was for me, a big deal. It doesn’t work for everybody. Um, in fact, they pretty much just let me alone to work. And that was also a huge thing, very important for ME. Doesn’t work for everybody. And it, cause it goes into my teaching, and I realize that not everybody is like me, but I know that space is necessary. You can’t just throw all your information at somebody, and say ok, this is it. Eat it .Take it all in now and this is how it works. So that balance of space but letting them know that you’re taking care of them in class-  it’s a balance I’m still working on

B: I think the thing that was the most changing was that I felt like I was at a home – and everybody knew everybody and talked to everybody – it was a big studio but … you know it was like a community. And you know the work – there was a lot of breathing and stretching and breathing and stretching and letting go and things weren’t necessarily explained all the time. I think  they were still trying to figure it OUT, what it was they were doing. They both worked with Irmgard Bartenieff, and so there’s a lot of that information in there. Um.. And also Dorothy had this emphasis on the pelvis which is also what led me to be really engrossed in what they were doing at THAT studio – because they were talking about the pelvis. But it was two totally opposite sides of the spectrum-  of how the pelvis sits on the legs. One was very muscular, and one was very not muscular.

D: oh yes [nodding] Dorothy …

B: Vislocky

D: Oh right. I didn’t register the name.

B: and she was a Nikolai dancer. But still, at the same time, she would think like, she had that context, but she would also point out things that nobody could really point out to me. She’d say look at that dancer’s stage presence, or look at that, that quality – she could see way underneath, way beyond what was just presented in front of your face. You know, look at the – It’s not just the choreography, but watch the body in motion, watch the presence, see the person come out -whether they’re dramatic and – what do people say –

D: expressive, maybe?

B: no, very out or kind of like inner quiet where the person can kind of draw an audience member to them… but  she pointed out these things to me, that I could actually see them. And it made me feel kind of weird,  but also, and unique, but I knew it was different than the way most people were looking at dance.

D: And how would you say most people were looking at dance?

B: Just what was presented right in front of them.

D: So like how high their legs were, or straight, or what the position of their foot …

B: Yeah. Right. Right

D: So you said there were these two sides of the spectrum. You had this pelvis in …

B: in Motion …

D: pelvis in a muscular way, and then in a not muscular way.

B: Right.

D: Could you say some more about that not muscular way?

B: Well it’s from the deep inner muscles that Irmgard talked about a lot, and Susan was very good at analyzing everything and so she broke down all of those exercises and Dorothy broke down all of her exercises, and um, then there was like no perfect body. You know the idea was to have the person be fluid enough to, to, be resilient as a mover. And to know themselves well enough to avoid major injuries, to pursue the kind of dance career that they wanted. I mean, sometimes it actually meant that you couldn’t do this high technical stuff, but it didn’t necessarily mean you couldn’t be a fabulous beautiful expressive dancer. Mover. [Nodding] {Laughs] You know cuz there’s all kinds of different styles, you know, there’s all kinds of different styles. Less so now, I think now, everything is very, I don’t know I always think it’s the economics – you know they need a job, they just go, they try it, they don’t get a job, they go do something else. [Laughing]

B: Oh. I’m talking so much. I’m sorry.

D: No. NO. That’s the point. [Laughing]. It’s good. I’m trying to restrain myself, actually. I tend to talk too much myself.

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Notes from an interview….. collected for a dissertation by Daisy Levy

HERE ARE SOME SCATTERED THOUGHTS TAKEN FROM AN INTERVIEW-WITH DAISY LEVY SUMMER 2011…ENJOY

B: And so I started dancing at 21.

D: And I started dancing at 19.

D: And I was pretty untalented.

B: I was very untalented. {Smiling]

D: And so it’s interesting to hear you talk about yourself, as a very accomplished, and well respected mover, it’s interesting to hear you talk about yourself that way………..

my injuries…….B: that was the first. Actually before that I had a back thing. And after that I had, tore a hamstring. All on the same leg. I sprained my ankle so that it was swollen for about 5 months cuz I didn’t stop dancing, and then I had an opposite injury on the inside of the foot. It was everything on this side.

D: Wow.

B: It wasn’t fun. Like 5 or 6 major injuries. And my back would go out a lot.

D: And what was that period of time. Was it like a year or several years?

B: About 4 years.

D: Ouch.

B: Yes. And then when I started studying seriously, with Susan- my back would still go out, but I would know. I learned to know when it was going to happen. I could feel my hamstrings go away. You know there’s this connection between the sits bones and the heels? And you know they talk about them in many different ways.  And So you know instead of feeling like there were grooves in the muscle, they would feel like they were like ICE. And then I would take myself to the chiropractor to get myself some body work. I would prevent. I just knew myself so well.

D: I think that’s a little bit of what I’m trying to write about. For academics – this knowing yourself, knowing your physical body in that way. So could you … I’m trying to think of how to ask a question, without telling you what I want you to say …

B: Well, I think what a lot of people learn about their bodies – is like this is good for you, and that’s not good for you. And this is good for you, and that’s not good for you. But they don’t necessarily have the time process available to them, or are encouraged, to actually experience it themselves. They just listen to what other people say this is good for, is not good for you. They come and see me and say ‘what exercises should I do.’ I say ‘well you have to come to class for 6 months.’ It’s like ‘6 months?’ [looks incredulous]. And then, now, you know people do stretching, so they just take stretch class once a week. And really stretch class is the basis for everything. It gives you your legs, it puts your pelvis on top of your legs, and brings your spine then into a much more easy upright, and brings your head up and facilitates movement from the heaven to the earth. To the ground, to propel you so you can feel powerful. You know what you said was missing. You know it’s not just stretching. And that’s really, that’s where it’s kind of stuck now. So people stretch cuz they know it’s good for them, and they do ab-work cuz they know it’s good for them. But there’s all these studies now about what the c ore actually is, and how damaging actually  some of the transverse exercises are to the lumbar spine, and you know we’ve been, people have been talking about it for 35 − 40 years. Mabel B. Todd. All of them.

D: Now – you just gave me a name. What was that name?

B: Mabel B. Todd wrote The Thinking Body in the 30s. And she … I read her book like the bible.

D: I’ve not ever … I know of her, but I’ve not ever read-

B: Its called The Thinking Body. There are some amazingly beautiful philosophical things in it.

D: Great.

B: So you know I think some people’s thinking is still somewhat cubed? Squared? You know so you don’t really  get to actually experience your body changing. And the other thing is, I think, sometimes too much emphasis on sensation. But sensation is so fleeing. You know you feel it, it’s gone. And, people have a sensation, they want to HAVE it. You know, this is my cue. But to go through this like, this self-wisdom, or body wisdom, to get to this place where you go way beyond , in terms of vertical learning, as opposed to linear learning, way deep into what that, where that sensation came from, and how, so you can use the tools, instead of aim for the sensation. Does that make sense?

D: Yes. It does make sense. I mean, I think, um, one of the reasons I came to, decided on this project. There are several, a handful of scholars in my field, who are interested in this idea of embodiment as a knowledge making practice. But it seems to me as I’m reading them, that what they’re really writing about is emotion.

D: Cuz I mean, the BODY.

B: Being in yourself. Being who you, deeply, in your self.

D: Deeply, like deep into your muscles and your bones and your nervous system and all of that.

B: Yeah. Right.

D: that is to me, that feels to me like embodiment. Affect is some part of it.

B: I completely agree.

B; But you know stretch class I think works on releasing the muscles and goes way underneath and gets the bones to be stacked up and lined up and energy, gravity travels through and bony structure actually changes – osteoblasts and osteoplasts and the whole system Wolf’s Law and so in a couple of years a body could entirely change. My body entirely changed.

D: What are some of those changes?

B: I can move my legs. That was one thing. I can backbend forever [demonstrates bending backwards from a seated position] which I couldn’t do when I was – and I can move my legs [lifts one leg far from the floor and out to the side] which I couldn’t do and I had endurance and I could move. I just couldn’t move. This is kind of a joke, but, you know, Susan said when I first was in class, I didn’t have a joint between my neck and my ankles. I was just like a sheath of muscle.

D: Right. So, this will sound like a really silly question – but what’s better about being able to move than not being able to move?

B: For me, it’s my – for me, it’s ME. I guess even way back then – I was not really an athletic kid, I was pretty uncoordinated I couldn’t ride a bike, I learned how to ride a bike at 35, I never did any sports except punch ball cuz that’s all we had – Pensy Pinky. Um … I don’t know, the expression that I feel connects me to something bigger than myself, is through moving. And through teaching, now. But through moving.

D: I’m hesitant to ask but would you say more about this connected to something bigger than yourself?

B: Well they call it, there’s a book called, of course there’s always a book, I like to read. It’s called Flow- something about flow, consciousness and flow. It’s like when you get connected to the universe, or you’re in flow with everything around you and things happen, connected to certain things, all these coincidences happen, and this leads to that, leads to that, leads to that. So That’s what I’m talking about, this kind of flow of being.

more to come……………

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